Indigenous Lands in the Brazilian Amazon: from budgeting to climate change mitigation

30 de setembro de 2015

set 30, 2015

Ana Carolina Crisostomo, Ane Alencar, Isabel Castro Silva, Isabel Mesquita, Martha Fellows Dourado, Paulo Moutinho, Pedro de Araújo Lima Constantino, Valderlli Piontekowski

In the Brazilian Amazon, indigenous peoples hold a significant portion of the local forest. Their Lands as a whole cover approximately 110 million hectares and contain about 30% of forest carbon in the region, which corresponds to something around 13 billion tons of carbon. This is equivalent to about a year of global emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). These territories play a key role in stopping the encroachment of deforestation in the region. Therefore, they play an extremely important role in the conservation of biodiversity and to achieve the GHG emissions reduction targets undertaken by Brazil through the law that established the National Policy on Climate Change (PNMC, Law n° 12,187/2009).

Baixar (sujeito à disponibilidade)

Download (subject to availability)



Este projeto está alinhado aos Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável (ODS).

Saiba mais em brasil.un.org/pt-br/sdgs.

Veja também

See also

Estimulando a Demanda por Reduções de Emissões de REDD+: A Necessidade de Intervenção Estratégica pré 2020

Estimulando a Demanda por Reduções de Emissões de REDD+: A Necessidade de Intervenção Estratégica pré 2020

IPAM lança estudo em parceria com o Global Canopy Programme, Fauna & Flora International (FFI), Iniciativa Financeira do PNUMA (UNEP/FI) e a Biofílica, intitulado “Estimulando a Demanda Interina por Reduções de Emissões de REDD+: A Necessidade de Intervenção Estratégica de 2015 a 2020”. O relatório mostra como a demanda por unidades de reduções de emissões de REDD+ é drasticamente inferior à oferta, no período interino entre 2015 e 2020.

Savanna vegetation structure in the Brazilian Cerrado allows for the accurate estimation of aboveground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

Savanna vegetation structure in the Brazilian Cerrado allows for the accurate estimation of aboveground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

Understanding structural variations in natural systems can help us understand their responses to disturbance and environmental changes and plan for the mitigation of human-induced impacts. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a technological solution to quickly and...