Effects of geomorphology and land use on stream water quality in southeastern Amazonia

12 de abril de 2019

abr 12, 2019

Hellen Kezia Silva Almad, Divino Vicente Silvério, Marcia Nunes Macedo, Leonardo Maracahipes-Santos, Elizabete Carolina Pinheiro Zaratim,Karina Pinheiro Zaratim, Alexsandro Maccari,Marcela Rodrigues Nascimento, Ricardo Keichi Umetsu

Water quality in streams is determined by several factors, including geology, topography, climate, and anthropogenic changes. This study aimed to assess the effects of watershed physical, morphology, and precipitation seasonality on the water quality of two streams that supply drinking water to rural settlements and urban areas in the Cerrado-Amazonia transition region. We monitored 16 physico-chemical attributes of water at six different sample locations over three years (2013–2016). Our results indicate that eight of these physico-chemical attributes did not meet the standards for safe drinking water established by Brazilian legislation. Precipitation seasonality, degradation of riparian zones, stream length, and watershed slope were the most important predictors of impaired water quality. Our results highlight the importance of restoring and conserving riparian forests in order to maintain drinking water quality.

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Este projeto está alinhado aos Objetivos de Desenvolvimento Sustentável (ODS).

Saiba mais em brasil.un.org/pt-br/sdgs.

Veja também

See also

Indigenous Peoples and the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) mechanism in the Brazilian Amazon – Subsidies to the Discussion of Benefits Sharing

Indigenous Peoples and the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) mechanism in the Brazilian Amazon – Subsidies to the Discussion of Benefits Sharing

The purpose of this publication is to provide a better understanding on the contribution of indigenous perspectives to the discussion of REDD+ benefit sharing, based on some indig- enous’ points of view and experiences of the Amazon indigenous peoples in Brazil. More specifically, the aim from a participatory and consultative process is to provide support for the construction benefit sharing models for REDD+ programs, which actually promotes inclu- sion of these people, focusing on the Brazilian context.