Biome

The word ‘biome’ – ‘bios’ (from Ancient Greek βίο, meaning ‘life’) and ‘ome’ (a variation of ōma, from Ancient Greek ωμα, meaning ‘mass’ or ‘group’) – was first used in 1943 by the American botanist Frederic Edward Clements, to define a biological unit or geographic space whose specific characteristics are defined by its macroclimate, phytophysiognomy, soil, and altitude. However, over the years, the definition of biome has changed from author to author.

Currently, biomes are groups of neighboring vegetation types that present similar geographic and climatic conditions. In other words, they are ecosystem sets, grouped according to the characteristics of vegetation, relief, and climate. The classification of these large plant formations into biomes began to emerge after the understanding that several regions of the planet have similar biological diversities (ecosystems), even when located in different continents.

There are seven main biomes in Brazil. They are: Amazon, caatinga, Cerrado, Atlantic Forest, Campos do Sul (Pampa), Pantanal, and coastal zones.

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See also

PNMC

PNMC

National Plan on Climate Change (Plano Nacional sobre Mudança do Clima, PNMC, in Portuguese) is the Brazilian official voluntary commitment with the UNFCCC to achieve greenhouse gases cut between 36.1% and 38.9% of the 2020 projected emissions. It has established...

Ratification

Ratification

After signing an international treaty, such as the Climate Change Convention or the Kyoto Protocol, a country has to ratify the commitment, often with the approval of its parliament or other legislature. The ratification instrument must be deposited with the UN...